1. Escape The Car Josh's Pancake Specials
  2. Escape The Car Josh's Pancake Mix
  3. Escape The Car Josh's Pancake Show
  4. Escape The Car Hooda Math

folktales of Aarne-Thompson type 2025
translated and/or edited by
D. L. Ashliman
© 2000

Contents

Powered by Create your own unique website with customizable templates. Scary escape rooms in Atlanta. From creepy themes to chilling thrillers and to horror movies with actors involved, you can decide just how scared you want to be when trying to make a successful escape! Most of the rooms aren't actually meant to scare you too much, just remember: your objective is to escape.

  1. The Pancake (Norway).
  2. The Runaway Pancake (Germany).
  3. The Thick, Fat Pancake (Germany).
  4. The Gingerbread Boy (USA).
  5. The Johnny-Cake (USA).
Return to D. L. Ashliman's folktexts, a library of folktales, folklore, fairy tales, and mythology.

The Pancake

Norway

Once upon a time there was a good housewife, who had seven hungry children. One day she was busy frying pancakes for them, and this time she had used new milk in the making of them. One was lying in the pan, frizzling away -- ah! so beautiful and thick -- it was a pleasure to look at it. The children were standing round the fire, and the husband sat in the corner and looked on.

'Oh, give me a bit of pancake, mother, I am so hungry!' said one child.

'Ah, do! dear mother,' said the second.

'Ah, do! dear, good mother,' said the third.

'Ah, do! dear, good, kind mother,' said the fourth.

'Ah, do! dear, good, kind, nice mother,' said the fifth.

'Ah, do! dear, good, kind, nice, sweet mother,' said the sixth.

'Ah, do! dear, good, kind, nice, sweet, darling mother,' said the seventh. And thus they were all begging for pancakes, the one more prettily than the other, because they were so hungry, and such good little children.

'Yes, children dear, wait a bit until it turns itself,' she answered -- she ought to have said 'until I turn it' -- 'and then you shall all have pancakes, beautiful pancakes, made of new milk -- only look how thick and happy it lies there.'

When the pancake heard this, it got frightened, and all of a sudden, it turned itself and wanted to get out of the pan, but it fell down in it again on the other side, and when it had been fried a little on that side too, it felt a little stronger in the back, jumped out on the floor, and rolled away, like a wheel, right through the door and down the road.

'Halloo!' cried the good wife, and away she ran after it, with the frying pan in one hand and the ladle in the other, as fast as she could, and the children behind her, while the husband came limping after, last of all.

'Halloo, won't you stop? Catch it, stop it. Halloo there!' they all screamed, the one louder than the other, trying to catch it on the run, but the pancake rolled and rolled, and before long, it was so far ahead, that they could not see it, for the pancake was much smarter on its legs than any of them.

When it had rolled a time, it met a man.

'Good day, pancake!' said the man.

'Well met, Manny Panny,' said the pancake.

'Dear pancake,' said the man, 'don't roll so fast, but wait a bit and let me eat you.'

'When I have run away from Goody Poody and the husband and seven squalling children, I must run away from you too, Manny Panny,' said the pancake, and rolled on and on, until it met a hen.

'Good day, pancake,' said the hen.

'Good day, Henny Penny,' said the pancake.

'My dear pancake, don't roll so fast, but wait a bit and let me eat you,' said the hen.

'When I have run away from Goody Poody and the husband and seven squalling children, and from Manny Panny, I must run away from you too, Henny Penny,' said the pancake, and rolled on like a wheel down the road. Then it met a cock.

'Good day, pancake,' said the cock.

'Good day, Cocky Locky,' said the pancake.

'My dear pancake, don't roll so fast, but wait a bit and let me eat you,' said the cock.

'When I have run away from Goody Poody and the husband and seven squalling children, from Manny Panny, and Henny Penny, I must run away from you too, Cocky Locky,' said the pancake, and rolled and rolled on as fast as it could. When it had rolled a long time, it met a duck.

'Good day, pancake,' said the duck.

'Good day, Ducky Lucky,' said the pancake.

Escape The Car Josh's Pancake Specials

'My dear pancake, don't roll so fast, but wait a bit and let me eat you,' said the duck.

'When I have run away from Goody Poody and the husband and seven squalling children, from Manny Panny, and Henny Penny, and Cocky Locky, I must run away from you too, Ducky Lucky,' said the pancake, and with that it fell to rolling and rolling as fast as ever it could. When it had rolled a long, long time, it met a goose.

Good day, pancake,' said the goose.

'Good day, Goosey Poosey,' said the pancake.

'My dear pancake, don't roll so fast, but wait a bit and let me eat you,' said the goose.

Escape The Car Josh's Pancake Mix

'When I have run away from Goody Poody and the husband and seven squalling children, from Manny Panny, and Henny Penny, and Cocky Locky, and Ducky Lucky, I must run away from you too, Goosey Poosey,' said the pancake, and away it rolled. So when it had rolled a long, very long time, it met a gander.

Good day, pancake,' said the gander.

'Good day, Gander Pander,' said the pancake.

'My dear pancake, don't roll so fast, but wait a bit and let me eat you,' said the gander.

'When I have run away from Goody Poody and the husband and seven squalling children, from Manny Panny, and Henny Penny, and Cocky Locky, and Ducky Lucky, and Goosey Poosey, I must run away from you too, Gander Pander,' said the pancake, and rolled and rolled as fast as it could. When it had rolled on a long, long time, it met a pig.

Good day, pancake,' said the pig.

'Good day, Piggy Wiggy,' said the pancake, and began to roll on faster than ever.

Escape The Car Josh's Pancake Show

Nay, wait a bit,' said the pig, 'you needn't be in such a hurry-scurry; we two can walk quietly together and keep each other company through the wood, because they say it isn't very safe there.'

The pancake thought there might be something in that, and so they walked together through the wood; but when they had gone some distance, they came to a brook.

The pig was so fat it wasn't much trouble for him to swim across, but the pancake couldn't get over.

'Sit on my snout,' said the pig, 'and I will ferry you over.'

The pancake did so.

'Ouf, ouf,' grunted the pig, and swallowed the pancake in one gulp, and as the pancake couldn't get any farther -- well, you see we can't go on with this story any farther, either.

  • Source: Peter Christen Asbjørnsen, Pannekaken, translated by H. L. Brækstad in Round the Yule Log: Norwegian Folk and Fairy Tales (Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, n.d.).
  • Return to the table of contents.

The Runaway Pancake

Germany

Two women in Jetzschko were baking a pancake, and when it was almost done they began to quarrel, because each one wanted the whole thing.

The one woman said, 'I get the pancake!'

The other one replied, 'No, I want all of it!'

Before they knew what was happening, the pancake suddenly grew feet, jumped out of the pan, and ran away.

He came to a fox, who said to him, 'Pancake, pancake, where are you going?'

The pancake answered, 'I ran away from two old women, and I shall run away from you as well!'

Then he met a hare. It too shouted, 'Pancake, pancake, where are you going?'

The pancake answered, 'I ran away from two old women, Reynard the Fox, and I shall run away from you as well.

The pancake ran on until he came to some water. A ship full of people was floating on the water. They too cried out to him, 'Pancake, pancake, where are you going?'

Again he said, 'I ran away from two old women, Reynard the Fox, Speedy the Hare, and I shall run away from you as well.'

Then he came to a large pig. It too shouted to him, 'Pancake, pancake, where are you going?'

'Oh,' he said, 'I ran away from two old women, Reynard the Fox, Speedy the Hare, a ship full of people, and I shall run away from you as well.'

The pig said, 'Pancake, I am hard of hearing. You'll have to say it into my ear!'

The

So the pancake went up close, and bam! bam! the pig snatched him and ate him up, and with that the story is ended.

  • Source: Karl Gander, 'Der fortgelaufene Eierkuchen,' Niederlausitzer Volkssagen, vornehmlich aus dem Stadt- und Landkreise Guben (Berlin: Deutsche Schriftsteller-Genossenschaft, 1894), no. 319, pp. 122-123.
  • Gander's source: 'Oral, from Hanschke, Senior, a cottager and peddler in Ögeln.'
  • Freely translated by D. L. Ashliman. © 2000.
  • Return to the table of contents.

The Thick, Fat Pancake

Germany

Once upon a time there were three old women who wanted a pancake to eat. The first one brought an egg, the second one milk, and the third one grease and flour. When the thick, fat pancake was done, it pulled itself up in the pan and ran away from the three old women. It ran and ran, steadfastly, steadfastly into the woods. There he came upon a little hare, who cried, 'Thick, fat pancake, stop! I want to eat you!'

The pancake answered, 'I have run away from three old women. Can I not run away from Hoppity Hare as well?' And it ran steadfastly, steadfastly into the woods.

Then a wolf came running toward him, and cried, 'Thick, fat pancake, stop! I want to eat you!'

The pancake answered, 'I have run away from three old women and Hoppity Hare. Can I not run away from Waddly Wolf as well?' And it ran steadfastly, steadfastly into the woods.

Then a goat came hopping by, and cried, 'Thick, fat pancake, stop! I want to eat you!'

The pancake answered, 'I have run away from three old women, Hoppity Hare, and Waddly Wolf. Can I not run away from Longbeard Goat as well?' And it ran steadfastly, steadfastly into the woods.

Then a horse came galloping by, and cried, 'Thick, fat pancake, stop! I want to eat you!'

The pancake answered, 'I have run away from three old women, Hoppity Hare, Waddly Wolf, and Longbeard Goat. Can I not run away from Flatfoot Horse as well?' And it ran steadfastly, steadfastly into the woods.

Then a sow came running up, and cried, 'Thick, fat pancake, stop! I want to eat you!'

The pancake answered, 'I have run away from three old women, Hoppity Hare, Waddly Wolf, Longbeard Goat, and Flatfoot Horse. Can I not run away from Oink-Oink Sow as well?' And it ran steadfastly, steadfastly into the woods.

Then three children came by. They had neither father nor mother, and they said, 'Dear pancake, stop! We have had nothing to eat the entire day!' So the thick, fat pancake jumped into the children's basket and let them eat it up.

  • Source: Carl and Theodor Colshorn, 'Vom dicken fetten Pfannekuchen,' Märchen und Sagen (Hannover: Verlag von Carl Rümpler, 1854), no. 57, pp. 168-169.
  • The Colshorns' source: 'oral, from Salzdahlum.'
  • Freely translated by D. L. Ashliman. © 2000.
  • Return to the table of contents.

The Gingerbread Boy

USA

Now you shall hear a story that somebody's great-great-grandmother told a little girl ever so many years ago:

There was once a little old man and a little old woman, who lived in a little old house in the edge of a wood. They would have been a very happy old couple but for one thing -- they had no little child, and they wished for one very much. One day, when the little old woman was baking gingerbread, she cut a cake in the shape of a little boy, and put it into the oven.

Presently she went to the oven to see if it was baked. As soon as the oven door was opened, the little gingerbread boy jumped out, and began to run away as fast as he could go.

The little old woman called her husband, and they both ran after him. But they could not catch him. And soon the gingerbread boy came to a barn full of threshers. He called out to them as he went by, saying:

I've run away from a little old woman,
A little old man,
And I can run away from you, I can!

Then the barn full of threshers set out to run after him. But, though they ran fast, they could not catch him. And he ran on till he came to a field full of mowers. He called out to them:

I've run away from a little old woman,
A little old man,
A barn full of threshers,
And I can run away from you, I can!

Then the mowers began to run after him, but they couldn't catch him. And he ran on till he came to a cow. He called out to her:

I've run away from a little old woman,
A little old man,
A barn full of threshers,
A field full of mowers,
And I can run away from you, I can!

But, though the cow started at once, she couldn't catch him. And soon he came to a pig. He called out to the pig:

I've run away from a little old woman,
A little old man,
A barn full of threshers,
A field full of mowers,
A cow,
And I can run away from you, I can!

But the pig ran, and couldn't catch him. And he ran till he came across a fox, and to him he called out:

I've run away from a little old woman,
A little old man,
A barn full of threshers,
A field full of mowers,
A cow and a pig,
And I can run away from you, I can!

Then the fox set out to run. Now foxes can run very fast, and so the fox soon caught the gingerbread boy and began to eat him up.

Presently the gingerbread boy said, 'Oh dear! I'm quarter gone!' And then, 'Oh, I'm half gone!' And soon, 'I'm three-quarters gone!' And at last, 'I'm all gone!' and never spoke again.

  • Source: St. Nicholas Magazine (May 1875), pp. 448-449.
  • Return to the table of contents.

Johnny-Cake

USA

Once upon a time there was an old man, and an old woman, and a little boy. One morning the old woman made a Johnny-Cake and put it in the oven to bake.

Escape The Car Hooda Math

'You watch the Johnny-Cake while your father and I go out to work in the garden.'

So the old man and the old woman went out and began to hoe potatoes and left the little boy to tend the oven. But he didn't watch it all the time, and all of a sudden he heard a noise, and he looked up and the oven door popped open, and out of the oven jumped Johnny-Cake and went rolling along end over end towards the open door of the house.

The little boy ran to shut the door, but Johnny-Cake was too quick for him and rolled through the door, down the steps, and out into the road long before the little boy could catch him. The little boy ran after him as fast as he could lip it, crying out to his father and mother, who heard the uproar and threw down their hoes and gave chase too. But Johnny-Cake outran all three a long way, and was soon out of sight, while they had to sit down, all out of breath, on a bank to rest.

On went Johnny-Cake, and by and by he came to two well-diggers, who looked up from their work and called out, 'Where are you going, Johnny-Cake?'

He said, 'I have outrun an old man and an old woman and a little boy, and I can outrun you too-o-o!'

'Ye can, can ye?' We'll see about that!' said they, and they threw down their picks and ran after him, but couldn't catch up with him, and soon they had to sit down by the roadside to rest.

On ran Johnny-Cake, and by and by he came to two ditch-diggers who were digging a ditch. 'Where ye going, Johnny-Cake?' said they.

He said, 'I've outrun an old man and an old woman and a little boy and two well-diggers, and I can outrun you too-o-o!'

'Ye can, can ye? We'll see about that!' said they, and they threw down their spades and ran after him too. But Johnny-Cake soon outstripped them also, and seeing they could never catch him, they gave up the chase and sat down to rest.

On went Johnny-Cake, and by and by he came to a bear. The bear said, 'Where are ye going, Johnny-Cake?'

He said, 'I've outrun an old man and an old woman and a little boy and two well-diggers and two ditch-diggers, and I can outrun you too-o-o!'

'Ye can, can ye?' growled the bear. 'We'll see about that!' and trotted as fast as his legs could carry him after Johnny-Cake, who never stopped to look behind him. Before long the bear was left so far behind that he saw he might as well give up the hunt first as last, so he stretched himself out by the roadside to rest.

On went Johnny-Cake, and by and by he came to a wolf. The wolf said, 'Where ye going, Johnny-Cake?'

He said, 'I've outrun an old man and an old woman and a little boy and two well-diggers and two ditch-diggers and a bear, an I can outrun you too-o-o!'

'Ye can, can ye?' snarled the wolf. 'We'll see about that!' And he set into a gallop after Johnny-Cake, who went on and on so fast that the wolf too saw there was no hope of overtaking him, and he too lay down to rest.

Microsoft office on mac os mac. Choose the right Microsoft 365 for your Mac Microsoft 365 makes your life more creative, organized, and secure. With Microsoft 365, you’ll always have the latest AI-powered Office apps, 1 TB of cloud storage, and premium mobile features. Start quickly with the most recent versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, OneNote and OneDrive —combining the familiarity of Office and the unique Mac features you love. Work online or offline, on your own or with others in real time—whatever.

On went Johnny-Cake, and by and by he came to a fox that lay quietly in a corner of the fence. The fox called out in a sharp voice, but without getting up, 'Where ye going, Johnny-Cake?'

He said, 'I've outrun an old man and an old woman and a little boy and two well-diggers and two ditch-diggers, a bear, and a wolf, and I can outrun you too-o-o!'

The fox said, 'I can't quite hear you, Johnny-Cake. Won't you come a little closer?' turning his head a little to one side.

Johnny-Cake stopped his race for the first time, and went a little closer, and called out in a very loud voice, 'I've outrun an old man and an old woman and a little boy and two well-diggers and two ditch-diggers and a bear and a wolf, and I can outrun you too-o-o!'

'Can't quite hear you. Won't you come a little closer?'

Johnny-Cake came up close, and leaning towards the fox screamed out, 'I'VE OUTRUN AN OLD MAN AND AN OLD WOMAN AND A LITTLE BOY AND TWO WELL-DIGGERS AND TWO DITCH-DIGGERS AND A BEAR AND A WOLF, AND I CAN OUTRUN YOU TOO-O-O!'

'You can, can you?' yelped the fox, and he snapped up the Johnny-Cake in his sharp teeth in the twinkling of an eye.

  • Source: Joseph Jacobs, English Fairy Tales (London: David Nutt, 1898), no. 28, pp. 155-158.
  • Jacobs' source: American Journal of Folk-Lore, vol. 2, p. 60.
  • Return to the table of contents.
Return to D. L. Ashliman's folktexts, a library of folktales, folklore, fairy tales, and mythology.

Revised April 8, 2000.

Escape the carjosh
Escape
Directed byMervyn LeRoy
Produced byMervyn LeRoy
Lawrence Weingarten (uncredited)
Screenplay byArch Oboler
Marguerite Roberts
Based onEscape
1939 novel
by Ethel Vance
StarringNorma Shearer
Robert Taylor
Conrad Veidt
Alla Nazimova
Music byFranz Waxman
CinematographyRobert H. Planck
Edited byGeorge Boemler
Distributed byMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release date
November 1, 1940
98 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$1,205,000[1][2]
Box office$1,357,000 (Domestic earnings)[1]
$1,007,000 (Foreign earnings)[1]

Escape is a 1940 drama film about an American in pre-World War IINazi Germany who discovers his mother is in a concentration camp and tries desperately to free her. It starred Norma Shearer, Robert Taylor, Conrad Veidt and Alla Nazimova. It was adapted from the novel of the same name by Grace Zaring Stone.

Plot[edit]

Famous German stage actress Emmy Ritter (Alla Nazimova) is held in a Nazi concentration camp. She is scheduled to be executed soon, but the sympathetic camp doctor, Ditten (Philip Dorn), has been a fan since childhood and offers to deliver a letter from her to her children..afterwards.

Emmy's son Mark Preysing (Robert Taylor), an American citizen, travels to Germany in search of his mother, but nobody, not even frightened old family friends, want anything to do with him. A German official tells Mark that she has been arrested and advises him to return to the United States.

The postmark of a returned letter guides Mark to the region where she is being held. There, he meets by chance Countess Ruby von Treck (Norma Shearer), an American-born widow, but she also does not want to become involved, at least at first. Then, she asks her lover, General Kurt von Kolb (Conrad Veidt), about Emmy and learns that she has been judged a traitor in a secret trial and sentenced to death.

At a concert, Mark encounters Doctor Ditten, who takes the opportunity to deliver Emmy's letter. Then, Ditten drugs Emmy into a coma, making it appear as if she has died. He tells Mark what he has done. Mark sends longtime family servant Fritz Keller (Felix Bressart) to collect the coffin, but the American's nervousness raises the suspicion of the political police and he is brought to the camp for questioning. He is allowed to take his mother's body away.

When the road is blocked by snow, Mark is forced to find heat and shelter for his mother at the house of the countess. The next day, he meets von Kolb, who is jealous of the younger man. Later, when Mark and a disguised Emmy leave for the airport, von Kolb guesses what is happening (from Mark's earlier lack of reaction to the news of his mother's 'death') and confronts the countess. She begs him not to interfere, but he is implacable. Knowing about his health problems, she taunts him with her love of Mark, which provokes him into having a heart attack, giving her new friends time to escape.

Cast[edit]

  • Norma Shearer as Countess Ruby von Treck
  • Robert Taylor as Mark Preysing
  • Conrad Veidt as General Kurt von Kolb
  • Alla Nazimova as Emmy Ritter
  • Felix Bressart as Fritz Keller
  • Philip Dorn as Dr. Berthold Ditten
  • Albert Bassermann as Dr. Arthur Henning, an unhelpful legal advisor
  • Edgar Barrier as the Commissioner of Police
  • Bonita Granville as Ursula, a suspicious student of the countess
  • Elsa Bassermann as Mrs. Henning
  • Blanche Yurka as Emmy's concentration camp nurse-matron
  • Lisa Golm as Anna, Emmy's ill cellmate

Box office[edit]

According to MGM records, the film earned $2,364,000 at the box office, resulting in a profit of $345,000.[2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ abcGlancy, H. Mark 'When Hollywood Loved Britain: The Hollywood 'British' Film 1939-1945' (Manchester University Press, 1999)
  2. ^ abThe Eddie Mannix Ledger, Los Angeles: Margaret Herrick Library, Center for Motion Picture Study.

External links[edit]

  • Escape on IMDb
  • Escape at the TCM Movie Database
  • Escape at the American Film Institute Catalog
Retrieved from 'https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Escape_(1940_film)&oldid=999117030'