The lithosphere, Greek for “rocky sphere,” is the outermost shell of the Earth. The term is also used to refer to the outermost rocky shell of other solid planets. It is a relatively thin layer, about 31 to 62 miles (50 to 100 km) thick under the oceans and 93 miles (150 km) thick on the continents. This layer is composed of the upper crust, about 3 miles (5 km) thick in the oceans and 40.3 mles (65 km) thick on the continents, and the upper mantle, which makes up the remainder. Separating the crust and the upper mantle is the Mohorovičić discontinuity, the point at which rocks become plastic rather than solid. Beneath the lithosphere is the asthenosphere, which continues the upper mantle, and is approximately the point at which the mantle becomes liquid.

This planetary shell consists of lithospheric plates, otherwise known as the tectonic plates, which drift slowly over time periods of millions of years. Their rate of drift is comparable to the rate at which a person's fingernails grow. Over long periods of time, however, they can create mighty structures, such as the Himalayan Mountains in Tibet. Mt. Everest and the other mountains were formed when the tectonic plate under India forced its way upwards into Asia.

Using careful measurement methods and the study of strata, paleontologists have determined that the tectonic plates have drifted all over the surface of the planet since at least 600 million years ago, when diverse fossils appeared. During this time, the continents started off separate, then merged together into the giant continent Pangaea, only to split up after a few hundred million years and create the continents people are familiar with today.

Lithospheric activity can have a profound effect on the surface above it. When Australia finally separated from Antarctica 50 million years ago, it allowed a new oceanic current — the circumpolar current — to flow around Antarctica and reinforce its own cooling. This froze the continent, which was previously covered in forests, killing all but the hardiest of life there. It also decreased the average global temperature by several degrees.

Model Number: FX330Take your steam, gas and liquid measurements to a whole new level with the digitally based SITRANS FX330 vortex flowmeter. Meter Our range includes - but is not limited to - Ultrasonic, Turbine, Variable Area and Electromagnetic, Switches and Valves, and with products from Burkert, Fairchild and Siemens Industry, you needn’t take our word for it, these big names have even bigger reputations for a reason.Whatever your industry, project or bespoke requirements, our technical support team is made up entirely of qualified and experienced engineers who are fully conversant with our entire product range, so why not give us a call on +44 (0) 800 328 8511 and we’ll work with you to find the most suitable products. Designed primarily for applications in auxiliary, supply and energy systems, this device is also highly versatile for use in the process industry. With its new features and enhanced functions like the integrated heat meter, NAMUR NE107 conform status alarms,and extensive Ex approvals, the SITRANS FX330 is also ideal for a broad range of chemical, power, and oil and gas installations.

Start studying Chapter seven. Geography Which feature is part of the lithosphere? Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. The lithosphere is the solid, outer part of the Earth. The lithosphere includes the brittle upper portion of the mantle and the crust, the outermost layers of Earth’s structure.It is bounded by the atmosphere above and the asthenosphere (another part of the upper mantle) below.' - National Geographic. A lithosphere outer covering of a terrestrial-type earth or all-natural satellite that is specified by its stiff mechanical homes. In the world, it is made up of the crust and also the portion of the upper mantle that behaves elastically promptly scales of hundreds of years or greater. Continental lithosphere is composed approximately of a 20- to 35-mile layer of light granitic crust underlain by a 60- to 80-mile layer of heavy mantle peridotite (an olivine-, pyroxene-rich rock; Figure 5.1). Recall that these layers together form a tectonic plate.

Although humans cannot dig very deeply into the Earth’s crust with current technology, geoscientists can study the properties of the deep lithosphere by examining special rocks, or xenoliths, brought up through deep volcanic pipes.

Lithosphere Facts For Kids

Lithosphere geography definition

The lithosphere, Greek for “rocky sphere,” is the outermost shell of the Earth. The term is also used to refer to the outermost rocky shell of other solid planets. It is a relatively thin layer, about 31 to 62 miles (50 to 100 km) thick under the oceans and 93 miles (150 km) thick on the continents. This layer is composed of the upper crust, about 3 miles (5 km) thick in the oceans and 40.3 mles (65 km) thick on the continents, and the upper mantle, which makes up the remainder. Separating the crust and the upper mantle is the Mohorovičić discontinuity, the point at which rocks become plastic rather than solid. Beneath the lithosphere is the asthenosphere, which continues the upper mantle, and is approximately the point at which the mantle becomes liquid.

This planetary shell consists of lithospheric plates, otherwise known as the tectonic plates, which drift slowly over time periods of millions of years. Their rate of drift is comparable to the rate at which a person's fingernails grow. Over long periods of time, however, they can create mighty structures, such as the Himalayan Mountains in Tibet. Mt. Everest and the other mountains were formed when the tectonic plate under India forced its way upwards into Asia.

Asthenosphere Definition

Using careful measurement methods and the study of strata, paleontologists have determined that the tectonic plates have drifted all over the surface of the planet since at least 600 million years ago, when diverse fossils appeared. During this time, the continents started off separate, then merged together into the giant continent Pangaea, only to split up after a few hundred million years and create the continents people are familiar with today.

Lithospheric activity can have a profound effect on the surface above it. When Australia finally separated from Antarctica 50 million years ago, it allowed a new oceanic current — the circumpolar current — to flow around Antarctica and reinforce its own cooling. This froze the continent, which was previously covered in forests, killing all but the hardiest of life there. It also decreased the average global temperature by several degrees.

Although humans cannot dig very deeply into the Earth’s crust with current technology, geoscientists can study the properties of the deep lithosphere by examining special rocks, or xenoliths, brought up through deep volcanic pipes.